Diabetic Foot Care, Why do you need Diabetic Shoes?

 

A common side effect of diabetes is “peripheral neuropathy,” which causes loss of sensation in the extremities. Ill-fitting shoes that rub or pinch the feet excessively can lead to ulceration and foot injury, simply because the diabetic does not feel the injury until it is too late.

The Foot and Ankle Clinics of America supports the research which states properly fitted diabetic shoes are very important in preventing such injuries. By partnering with Dr. Comfort, Foot and Ankle Clinics of America can provide footwear and specialty insoles for diabetics to help alleviate and/or prevent foot pain and injury.

Diabetic shoes are often wider and deeper than regular shoes, to make room for special diabetic insoles. To ensure proper fit, minimize rubbing and uneven weight distribution, pedorthic insoles for diabetics are generally custom made for the patient’s feet, thus preventing injury. It is also important for a diabetic to have shoes with good air circulation; therefore many diabetic footwear features fabric or sandal-style uppers.

If you have any questions about diabetic shoes and their benefits, please contact one of our offices today to speak with one of our podiatrists about your specific needs.

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That Pain in Your Back Could be Linked to Your Feet

Back pain and feet by Foot Health Facts

If your lower back has been hurting, and you don’t remember doing anything to injure it, the source of your pain could be your feet! Foot pain is something that many people try to ignore. After all, doesn’t everyone’s feet hurt now and then? But if foot pain is something that has been with you for quite awhile, it could be causing problems in your ankles, knees, hips and even your back.

That old song, “The leg bone’s connected to the thigh bone…The thigh bone’s connected to the hip bone…,” tells the whole story. Our bodies are like a chain, with one link–or bone–connecting at the joint to another link. Think about what would happen if the first link in the chain was out of position. The point at which it meets the next link would eventually overstress that link and adversely affect the entire chain.

That’s what happens when we have foot pain. If the normal way of walking is painful, we instinctively change our walking pattern. Say you have arthritis, and your big toe joint hurts, so you change our gait to avoid bending the joint when you walk. Changing your gait changes the mechanics of your ankle joint, eventually causing ankle pain. This change in your walking pattern can also affect the whole chain of your lower body… from the ankle, to the knee, to the hip, and then to the lower back.

When foot pain or a foot deformity causes you to change the way you walk, it changes the way the bones of all those other joints move with each other. Cartilage in the joints can wear down, ligaments and tendons can be stressed beyond their normal range, and arthritis can set in.

If your feet or ankles aren’t working right, don’t ignore them! Contact a foot and ankle surgeon for an evaluation. Your back (and knees and hips) will thank you!