Summer Foot Health by Foot and Ankle Clinics of America

Take Care of your Feet this Summer

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The average person walks approximately 4 miles per day, which means your feet will endure the force of several hundred tons, and with 25% of our bodies bones in our feet they will bear the brunt of much of the abuse whether you know it or not.

This Summer is a wake up call to take care of your feet.

To keep your feet in good shape this year, we recommend that you soak (and than dry), exfoliate, moisturize and massage them as often as possible. If you find life is too busy for all of these steps, at the very least take off your shoes and socks and put your feet up. Changing socks throughout the day is always a great way to take care of your feet and never wear the same shoes two days in a row. Let them air out too.

How we can help you with your feet

Foot & Ankle Clinics of America treat ailments such as Sport Injuries, Bunions, Heel Pain, Ingrown Toenails, Warts, Arthritic / Joint Pain, Diabetic Ulcers, Bone Spurs, Hammertoes, Neuromas and Toenail Fungus.

Foot Experts of America Invite you to explore why our podiatric surgeons in the chicago area are the smart choice. Please check out our list o podiatry services, and surgical sections. At FACA our doctors and staff want to make sure your treatment is comfortable and pleasant. Contact us if you have any questions, or to make an appointment, and we look forward to helping you.

We are happy to serve your foot and ankle needs. Call us to make an appointment and let us help you! (773) 752 2111

http://www.FootExperts.com

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Diabetic Foot Care, Why do you need Diabetic Shoes?

 

A common side effect of diabetes is “peripheral neuropathy,” which causes loss of sensation in the extremities. Ill-fitting shoes that rub or pinch the feet excessively can lead to ulceration and foot injury, simply because the diabetic does not feel the injury until it is too late.

The Foot and Ankle Clinics of America supports the research which states properly fitted diabetic shoes are very important in preventing such injuries. By partnering with Dr. Comfort, Foot and Ankle Clinics of America can provide footwear and specialty insoles for diabetics to help alleviate and/or prevent foot pain and injury.

Diabetic shoes are often wider and deeper than regular shoes, to make room for special diabetic insoles. To ensure proper fit, minimize rubbing and uneven weight distribution, pedorthic insoles for diabetics are generally custom made for the patient’s feet, thus preventing injury. It is also important for a diabetic to have shoes with good air circulation; therefore many diabetic footwear features fabric or sandal-style uppers.

If you have any questions about diabetic shoes and their benefits, please contact one of our offices today to speak with one of our podiatrists about your specific needs.

That Pain in Your Back Could be Linked to Your Feet

Back pain and feet by Foot Health Facts

If your lower back has been hurting, and you don’t remember doing anything to injure it, the source of your pain could be your feet! Foot pain is something that many people try to ignore. After all, doesn’t everyone’s feet hurt now and then? But if foot pain is something that has been with you for quite awhile, it could be causing problems in your ankles, knees, hips and even your back.

That old song, “The leg bone’s connected to the thigh bone…The thigh bone’s connected to the hip bone…,” tells the whole story. Our bodies are like a chain, with one link–or bone–connecting at the joint to another link. Think about what would happen if the first link in the chain was out of position. The point at which it meets the next link would eventually overstress that link and adversely affect the entire chain.

That’s what happens when we have foot pain. If the normal way of walking is painful, we instinctively change our walking pattern. Say you have arthritis, and your big toe joint hurts, so you change our gait to avoid bending the joint when you walk. Changing your gait changes the mechanics of your ankle joint, eventually causing ankle pain. This change in your walking pattern can also affect the whole chain of your lower body… from the ankle, to the knee, to the hip, and then to the lower back.

When foot pain or a foot deformity causes you to change the way you walk, it changes the way the bones of all those other joints move with each other. Cartilage in the joints can wear down, ligaments and tendons can be stressed beyond their normal range, and arthritis can set in.

If your feet or ankles aren’t working right, don’t ignore them! Contact a foot and ankle surgeon for an evaluation. Your back (and knees and hips) will thank you!

Toe and Metatarsal Fractures (Broken toes)

Repost from http://www.foothealthfacts.org/

The structure of the foot is complex, consisting of bones, muscles, tendons, and other soft tissues. Of the 26 bones in the foot, 19 are toe bones (phalanges) and metatarsal bones (the long bones in the midfoot). Fractures of the toe and metatarsal bones are common and require evaluation by a specialist. A foot and ankle surgeon should be seen for proper diagnosis and treatment, even if initial treatment has been received in an emergency room.

What Is a Fracture?
A fracture is a break in the bone. Fractures can be divided into two categories: traumatic fractures and stress fractures.

Toe FractureTraumatic fractures (also called acute fractures) are caused by a direct blow or impact, such as seriously stubbing your toe. Traumatic fractures can bedisplaced or non-displaced. If the fracture is displaced, the bone is broken in such a way that it has changed in position (dislocated).

Signs and symptoms of a traumatic fracture include:

  • You may hear a sound at the time of the break.
  • “Pinpoint pain” (pain at the place of impact) at the time the fracture occurs and perhaps for a few hours later, but often the pain goes away after several hours.
  • Crooked or abnormal appearance of the toe.
  • Bruising and swelling the next day.
  • It is not true that “if you can walk on it, it’s not broken.” Evaluation by a foot and ankle surgeon is always recommended.

Stress fractures are tiny, hairline breaks that are usually caused by repetitive stress. Stress fractures often afflict athletes who, for example, too rapidly increase their running mileage. They can also be caused by an abnormal foot structure, deformities, or osteoporosis. Improper footwear may also lead to stress fractures. Stress fractures should not be ignored. They require proper medical attention to heal correctly.

Symptoms of stress fractures include:

  • Pain with or after normal activity
  • Pain that goes away when resting and then returns when standing or during activity
  • “Pinpoint pain” (pain at the site of the fracture) when touched
  • Swelling, but no bruising

Consequences of Improper Treatment
Some people say that “the doctor can’t do anything for a broken bone in the foot.” This is usually not true. In fact, if a fractured toe or metatarsal bone is not treated correctly, serious complications may develop. For example:

  • A deformity in the bony architecture which may limit the ability to move the foot or cause difficulty in fitting shoes
  • Arthritis, which may be caused by a fracture in a joint (the juncture where two bones meet), or may be a result of angular deformities that develop when a displaced fracture is severe or hasn’t been properly corrected
  • Chronic pain and deformity
  • Non-union, or failure to heal, can lead to subsequent surgery or chronic pain.

Treatment of Toe Fractures
Fractures of the toe bones are almost always traumatic fractures. Treatment for traumatic fractures depends on the break itself and may include these options:

  • Rest. Sometimes rest is all that is needed to treat a traumatic fracture of the toe.
  • Splinting. The toe may be fitted with a splint to keep it in a fixed position.
  • Rigid or stiff-soled shoe. Wearing a stiff-soled shoe protects the toe and helps keep it properly positioned.
  • “Buddy taping” the fractured toe to another toe is sometimes appropriate, but in other cases it may be harmful.
  • Surgery. If the break is badly displaced or if the joint is affected, surgery may be necessary. Surgery often involves the use of fixation devices, such as pins.

Treatment of Metatarsal Fractures
Breaks in the metatarsal bones may be either stress or traumatic fractures. Certain kinds of fractures of the metatarsal bones present unique challenges.

For example, sometimes a fracture of the first metatarsal bone (behind the big toe) can lead to arthritis. Since the big toe is used so frequently and bears more weight than other toes, arthritis in that area can make it painful to walk, bend, or even stand.

Another type of break, called a Jones fracture, occurs at the base of the fifth metatarsal bone (behind the little toe). It is often misdiagnosed as an ankle sprain, and misdiagnosis can have serious consequences since sprains and fractures require different treatments. Your foot and ankle surgeon is an expert in correctly identifying these conditions as well as other problems of the foot.

Treatment of metatarsal fractures depends on the type and extent of the fracture, and may include:

  • Rest. Sometimes rest is the only treatment needed to promote healing of a stress or traumatic fracture of a metatarsal bone.
  • Avoid the offending activity. Because stress fractures result from repetitive stress, it is important to avoid the activity that led to the fracture. Crutches or a wheelchair are sometimes required to offload weight from the foot to give it time to heal.
  • Immobilization, casting, or rigid shoe. A stiff-soled shoe or other form of immobilization may be used to protect the fractured bone while it is healing.
  • Surgery. Some traumatic fractures of the metatarsal bones require surgery, especially if the break is badly displaced.
  • Follow-up care. Your foot and ankle surgeon will provide instructions for care following surgical or non-surgical treatment. Physical therapy, exercises and rehabilitation may be included in a schedule for return to normal activities.

For all Appointments and Inquiries, please call: (773) 752 2111

We are happy to hear from you. Please contact us using the information below:

Chicagoland and Evanston Podiatry Locations in Illinois:

Hyde Park Beverly
1644 East 53rd Street
Chicago, IL 60615Tel: (773) 752 2111
Fax: (773) 752 6703Click here for driving
directions and location
map.
9333 S. Western Avenue
Suite 102
Chicago, IL 60643Tel: (773) 445 8700
Fax: (773) 445 4646Click here for driving directions and location map
Gold Coast Orland Park
30 W. Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60610Tel: (312) 280 7886
Fax: (312) 280 9547Click here for driving,
directions and location
map.
9501 W. 144th Place
Suite #106
Orland Park, IL 60462by Lagrange road (Rt.45) and 144th PLTel: (708) 403 3668
Fax: (708) 403 3684Click here for driving directions and location map.
9501 W. 144th Place
Evanston Lakeview/ Lincoln Park
1605 Chicago Avenue
Evanston, IL 60201Tel: (847) 424 9888
Fax: (847) 424 9649Click here for driving
directions and location
map.
(Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center)
3000 N. Halsted Street
Suite 621
Chicago, IL 60657
Tel: (773) 871 2250
Fax: (773) 697 0134Click here for driving directions and location map.
(Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center)

Northwest Indiana Podiatry Locations:

East Chicago Highland
(St. Catherine Hospital)
Professional Building
4320 Fir Street
Suite 216
East Chicago, IN 46312Tel: (219) 398 0100
Fax: (219) 398 4192Click here for driving directions and location map.
4320 Fir Street, Suite 216, East Chicago, IN 46312
3100 45th Avenue
Highland, IN 46322Tel: (219) 922 0510
Fax: (219) 972 6968Click here for driving directions and location map.
3100 45th Avenue, Highland, IN 46322
Munster
9134 Columbia Avenue
Suite B
Munster, IN 46321Tel: (219) 836 3112
Fax: (219) 836 3109Click here for driving directions and location map.
9134 Columbia Avenue, Suite B, Munster, IN 46321

Email: info@footexperts.com
Website: www.footexperts.com

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What Is an Ingrown Toenail?

Ingrown Toenail

When a toenail is ingrown, it is curved and grows into the skin, usually at the nail borders (the sides of the nail). This “digging in” of the nail irritates the skin, often creating pain, redness, swelling, and warmth in the toe.

If an ingrown nail causes a break in the skin, bacteria may enter and cause an infection in the area, which is often marked by drainage and a foul odor. However, even if the toe isn’t painful, red, swollen, or warm, a nail that curves downward into the skin can progress to an infection.

Ingrown1

Causes
Causes of ingrown toenails include:

  • Heredity. In many people, the tendency for ingrown toenails is inherited.
  • Trauma. Sometimes an ingrown toenail is the result of trauma, such as stubbing your toe, having an object fall on your toe, or engaging in activities that involve repeated pressure on the toes, such as kicking or running.
  • Improper trimming. The most common cause of ingrown toenails is cutting your nails too short. This encourages the skin next to the nail to fold over the nail.
  • Improperly sized footwear. Ingrown toenails can result from wearing socks and shoes that are tight or short.
  • Nail Conditions. Ingrown toenails can be caused by nail problems, such as fungal infections or losing a nail due to trauma.

Ingrown2Treatment
Sometimes initial treatment for ingrown toenails can be safely performed at home. However, home treatment is strongly discouraged if an infection is suspected, or for those who have medical conditions that put feet at high risk, such as diabetes, nerve damage in the foot, or poor circulation.

Home care:
If you don’t have an infection or any of the above medical conditions, you can soak your foot in room-temperature water (adding Epsom’s salt may be recommended by your doctor), and gently massage the side of the nail fold to help reduce the inflammation.

Avoid attempting “bathroom surgery.” Repeated cutting of the nail can cause the condition to worsen over time. If your symptoms fail to improve, it’s time to see a foot and ankle surgeon.

Physician care:
After examining the toe, the foot and ankle surgeon will select the treatment best suited for you. If an infection is present, an oral antibiotic may be prescribed.

Sometimes a minor surgical procedure, often performed in the office, will ease the pain and remove the offending nail. After applying a local anesthetic, the doctor removes part of the nail’s side border. Some nails may become ingrown again, requiring removal of the nail root.

Following the nail procedure, a light bandage will be applied. Most people experience very little pain after surgery and may resume normal activity the next day. If your surgeon has prescribed an oral antibiotic, be sure to take all the medication, even if your symptoms have improved.

Preventing Ingrown Toenails
Many cases of ingrown toenails may be prevented by:

  • Proper trimming. Cut toenails in a fairly straight line, and don’t cut them too short. You should be able to get your fingernail under the sides and end of the nail.
  • Well-fitted shoes and socks. Don’t wear shoes that are short or tight in the toe area. Avoid shoes that are loose, because they too cause pressure on the toes, especially when running or walking briskly.

 

What You Should Know About Home Treatment 

  • Don’t cut a notch in the nail. Contrary to what some people believe, this does not reduce the tendency for the nail to curve downward.
  • Don’t repeatedly trim nail borders. Repeated trimming does not change the way the nail grows, and can make the condition worse.
  • Don’t place cotton under the nail. Not only does this not relieve the pain, it provides a place for harmful bacteria to grow, resulting in infection.
  • Over-the-counter medications are ineffective. Topical medications may mask the pain, but they don’t correct the underlying problem.

 

For all Appointments and Inquiries, please call: (773) 752 2111

We are happy to hear from you. Please contact us using the information below:

Chicagoland and Evanston Podiatry Locations in Illinois:

Hyde Park Beverly
1644 East 53rd Street
Chicago, IL 60615Tel: (773) 752 2111
Fax: (773) 752 6703Click here for driving
directions and location
map.
9333 S. Western Avenue
Suite 102
Chicago, IL 60643Tel: (773) 445 8700
Fax: (773) 445 4646Click here for driving directions and location map
Gold Coast Orland Park
30 W. Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60610Tel: (312) 280 7886
Fax: (312) 280 9547Click here for driving,
directions and location
map.
9501 W. 144th Place
Suite #106
Orland Park, IL 60462by Lagrange road (Rt.45) and 144th PLTel: (708) 403 3668
Fax: (708) 403 3684Click here for driving directions and location map.
9501 W. 144th Place
Evanston Lakeview/ Lincoln Park
1605 Chicago Avenue
Evanston, IL 60201Tel: (847) 424 9888
Fax: (847) 424 9649Click here for driving
directions and location
map.
(Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center)
3000 N. Halsted Street
Suite 621
Chicago, IL 60657
Tel: (773) 871 2250
Fax: (773) 697 0134Click here for driving directions and location map.
(Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center)

Northwest Indiana Podiatry Locations:

East Chicago Highland
(St. Catherine Hospital)
Professional Building
4320 Fir Street
Suite 216
East Chicago, IN 46312Tel: (219) 398 0100
Fax: (219) 398 4192Click here for driving directions and location map.
4320 Fir Street, Suite 216, East Chicago, IN 46312
3100 45th Avenue
Highland, IN 46322Tel: (219) 922 0510
Fax: (219) 972 6968Click here for driving directions and location map.
3100 45th Avenue, Highland, IN 46322

 

Munster
9134 Columbia Avenue
Suite B
Munster, IN 46321Tel: (219) 836 3112
Fax: (219) 836 3109Click here for driving directions and location map.
 

Advancing Tissue Healing Without Surgery by Foot Health Facts

You don’t have to be a professional athlete to benefit from a new procedure called platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy.

Used in Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward and Major League pitcher Takashi Saito, the technique also is being used to treat foot and ankle conditions in “weekend warriors” and to heal wounds in diabetics. It can even help those suffering from arthritis, according to Sean T. Grambart, DPM, FACFAS, an Illinois foot and ankle surgeon.

PRP is a growth factor found in blood platelets that can promote the healing of bones, cartilage, blood vessels, tendons and tissue. A small vial of the patient’s blood is spun in a centrifuge to separate out the PRP, which then is injected at the injury site.

According to Grambart, he has used PRP for almost three years now and has experienced successful responses with it in his patients. “I have seen positive outcomes with chronic Achilles tendon pain, bone healing for non-unions and acute ligament injuries in athletes. I also have seen it work well in patients with chronic pain syndromes.”

For example, Dr. Grambart uses PRP when conservative measures such as medication, splints and physical therapy have failed in patients with chronic Achilles tendon pain. “Instead of performing a surgical procedure that involves opening the Achilles tendon, removing the scar tissue and requiring the patient to have about a six-month recovery, we can inject PRP into the tendon to bring the growth factors directly to the tendon, which can stimulate healing.”

The biggest advantage, he said, is the recovery is easier for the patient. After the procedure, the patient wears a protective boot for about two to five days and then can start to advance activities. “Patients usually notice improvement within four to six weeks and if needed, additional injections can be given as well to maximize the benefit.”

PRP therapy, however, is not a cure-all. As with most treatments, it may not work for everyone, but research to find the full effectiveness of PRP in the treatment of foot and ankle conditions continues, Dr. Grambart acknowledged.

Dr. Grambart is optimistic about the potential uses of PRP. “I think we are just seeing the tip of the iceberg with how PRP affects the different tissues within the body and how it can be used to advance healing,” he said.

 

For all of your foot care questions and needs visit us online at http://www.FootExperts.com.

 

A Winning Strategy: Don’t Play Through Pain

TIMELY TREATMENT AND REHABILITATION KEY TO PROPER HEALING by Foot Health facts

Sometimes athletes can be their own worst enemy especially when they continue to play following an injury to a foot or ankle. To ensure proper recovery from an injury, athletes should seek a proper diagnosis, prompt treatment and full healing and rehabilitation.

Athletes often misunderstand how serious an injury can be and try to rush back into competition without appropriate treatment and rehabilitation. Some of the most difficult cases seen by foot and ankle surgeons are those in which athletes have continued to play after an injury. Orlando, Florida, foot and ankle surgeon, Robert Duggan, DPM, FACFAS, says, “Athletes often make the mistake of ignoring what seems like a minor foot or ankle injury because they are able to walk. Serious injuries can exist even when the foot or ankle is able to accept weight or pressure.”

PlayingSoccer.jpgOne such injury involves the Lisfranc joint, on the top of the foot. It’s possible to walk with a Lisfranc injury, but this can lead to damage to the soft tissues of the foot or even chronic conditions such as arthritis. “Sometimes the pain of this injury is mistaken for an ankle sprain, but treatment for the two conditions is very different,” Dr. Duggan comments.

Another injury that may be overlooked is a fracture of the fifth metatarsal—the bone that runs along the outer side of the foot. This can accompany an ankle sprain, or the athlete may think it’s a sprain. However, this injury is difficult to heal, and continuing to participate in sports will make it worse.

Playing with pain is never a good strategy for athletes. Prompt treatment is. “Foot and ankle surgeons can determine the best course of treatment for the specific injury and help get athletes back into the game,” Dr. Duggan comments.

 For all your foot care questions please contact us online at http://www.FootExperts.com