Summer Foot Health by Foot and Ankle Clinics of America

Take Care of your Feet this Summer

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The average person walks approximately 4 miles per day, which means your feet will endure the force of several hundred tons, and with 25% of our bodies bones in our feet they will bear the brunt of much of the abuse whether you know it or not.

This Summer is a wake up call to take care of your feet.

To keep your feet in good shape this year, we recommend that you soak (and than dry), exfoliate, moisturize and massage them as often as possible. If you find life is too busy for all of these steps, at the very least take off your shoes and socks and put your feet up. Changing socks throughout the day is always a great way to take care of your feet and never wear the same shoes two days in a row. Let them air out too.

How we can help you with your feet

Foot & Ankle Clinics of America treat ailments such as Sport Injuries, Bunions, Heel Pain, Ingrown Toenails, Warts, Arthritic / Joint Pain, Diabetic Ulcers, Bone Spurs, Hammertoes, Neuromas and Toenail Fungus.

Foot Experts of America Invite you to explore why our podiatric surgeons in the chicago area are the smart choice. Please check out our list o podiatry services, and surgical sections. At FACA our doctors and staff want to make sure your treatment is comfortable and pleasant. Contact us if you have any questions, or to make an appointment, and we look forward to helping you.

We are happy to serve your foot and ankle needs. Call us to make an appointment and let us help you! (773) 752 2111

http://www.FootExperts.com

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Simple Suggestions for Healthy Feet

A few foot friendly tips from Dr. Massuda and her staff

  • Keep your feet clean and dry.
  • Apply olive oil or lanolin to dry skin.
  • Avoid using hot water and use mild soaps.
  • Dry skin carefully and completely. Do not rub hard with a towel.
  • Avoid if possible athlete’s foot infection, use a mild fungicidal powder.
  • Do not cut callouses, corns, or ingrown toe nails.
  • Avoid bruises, burns, cracks, cuts, and frostbite. If any of these injuries occur, seek professional advice immediately.
  •  Avoid using harsh or strong medications such as antiseptics containing iodine or carbolic acid, etc., corn cures, or chemical compounds and ointments for athlete’s foot.
  • Avoid exposure to cold and dampness.
  • Seek immediate professional care for any ulcer or sore on the foot or leg.
  • Proper care and treatment of your feet will relieve pain and help your feet to carry on the duties necessary to living a full and happy life.

If you are having trouble with your feet or ankles, don’t ignore them! Contact us for an evaluation at (773) 752-2111. Your back (and knees and hips) will thank you later.

 

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Easy ways to stop smelly feet

Smelly feet is also medically know as bromodosis, which is a common year round problem. It can be embarrassing and unpleasant for you and people around you when your feet smell.

The main cause is sweaty feet combined with wearing the same shoes every day.

Faca feet post

Why feet sweat

Did you know that there are more sweat glands in our feet than anywhere else in the body?

Anyone can get sweaty feet, regardless of the temperature or time of year, but teenagers, diabetics, and pregnant women are especially prone because hormonal and insulin changes in your body that make them sweat.

You are also more likely to have foot perspiration if you are on your feet all day or if you are under a lot of stress or you have a medical condition called hyperhidrosis, which makes you sweat more than usual. Fungal infections, such as athlete’s foot, can also lead to sweaty feet with bad foot odor.

According to Dr. Massuda, Podiatrist and President of Foot and Ankle Clinics of America, your feet become smelly if sweat soaks into shoes and they do not dry before you wear them again.

The Bacteria on the skin break down the sweat as it comes from your pores. An odor is released as the sweat decomposes.

“Your feet sweat into your shoes all day so they get damp and bacteria starts to grow. The bacteria continue to breed once you have taken your shoes off, and especially if you put them in a dark cupboard. Then, when you put your shoes back on the next day, even if you have just had a shower, putting your feet into still damp shoes creates the perfect conditions for the bacteria to thrive again with warm, dark and moist conditions.”

Preventing smelly feet

According to Dr.Massuda, keeping feet fresh and sweet smelling is all down to good personal hygiene and changing your shoes regularly.

“The key is never to wear the same pair of shoes two days in a row,” Dr. Massuda says. “Instead, try wearing different shoes on successive days so they have a minimum of 24 hours to dry out. And make sure teenage boys and girls have two pairs of gym shoes so that they do not have to wear the same pair for two or more consecutive days.”

Dr. Massuda says that it is also important to wash and dry your feet every day and to change your socks at least once a day.

If you are particularly susceptible to sweaty feet, Dr. Massuda suggests that you could also:

  • dab between your toes with cotton wool dipped in mineral spirits after a shower or bath – mineral spirits helps dry out the skin between the toes really well – in addition to drying them with a towel
  • use a spray deodorant or antiperspirant on your feet – a normal underarm deodorant or antiperspirant works just as well as a specialist foot product and will cost you a lot less
  • put medicated insoles, which have a deodorising effect, in your shoes
  • try feet fresh socks – some sports socks have ventilation panels to keep feet dry, and antibacterial socks are impregnated with chemicals to discourage the odor producing bacteria that feed on sweat
  • wear leather or canvas shoes, as they let your feet breathe, unlike plastic ones
  • wear open toe sandals in summer and go barefoot at home in the evenings

When to see a doctor

Smelly feet are a common problem that usually clears up, but sometimes it can be a sign of a medical condition.

See your Podiatrist if simple measures to reduce your foot odor do not help, or if you are worried that your level of sweating is abnormally high.

Dr. Massuda can offer you a treatment. Please contact us at (773) 752-2111.

http://www.FootExperts.com

Diabetic Foot Care, Why do you need Diabetic Shoes?

 

A common side effect of diabetes is “peripheral neuropathy,” which causes loss of sensation in the extremities. Ill-fitting shoes that rub or pinch the feet excessively can lead to ulceration and foot injury, simply because the diabetic does not feel the injury until it is too late.

The Foot and Ankle Clinics of America supports the research which states properly fitted diabetic shoes are very important in preventing such injuries. By partnering with Dr. Comfort, Foot and Ankle Clinics of America can provide footwear and specialty insoles for diabetics to help alleviate and/or prevent foot pain and injury.

Diabetic shoes are often wider and deeper than regular shoes, to make room for special diabetic insoles. To ensure proper fit, minimize rubbing and uneven weight distribution, pedorthic insoles for diabetics are generally custom made for the patient’s feet, thus preventing injury. It is also important for a diabetic to have shoes with good air circulation; therefore many diabetic footwear features fabric or sandal-style uppers.

If you have any questions about diabetic shoes and their benefits, please contact one of our offices today to speak with one of our podiatrists about your specific needs.

That Pain in Your Back Could be Linked to Your Feet

Back pain and feet by Foot Health Facts

If your lower back has been hurting, and you don’t remember doing anything to injure it, the source of your pain could be your feet! Foot pain is something that many people try to ignore. After all, doesn’t everyone’s feet hurt now and then? But if foot pain is something that has been with you for quite awhile, it could be causing problems in your ankles, knees, hips and even your back.

That old song, “The leg bone’s connected to the thigh bone…The thigh bone’s connected to the hip bone…,” tells the whole story. Our bodies are like a chain, with one link–or bone–connecting at the joint to another link. Think about what would happen if the first link in the chain was out of position. The point at which it meets the next link would eventually overstress that link and adversely affect the entire chain.

That’s what happens when we have foot pain. If the normal way of walking is painful, we instinctively change our walking pattern. Say you have arthritis, and your big toe joint hurts, so you change our gait to avoid bending the joint when you walk. Changing your gait changes the mechanics of your ankle joint, eventually causing ankle pain. This change in your walking pattern can also affect the whole chain of your lower body… from the ankle, to the knee, to the hip, and then to the lower back.

When foot pain or a foot deformity causes you to change the way you walk, it changes the way the bones of all those other joints move with each other. Cartilage in the joints can wear down, ligaments and tendons can be stressed beyond their normal range, and arthritis can set in.

If your feet or ankles aren’t working right, don’t ignore them! Contact a foot and ankle surgeon for an evaluation. Your back (and knees and hips) will thank you!

Peroneal Tendon Injuries by Foot Health Facts

What Are the Peroneal Tendons?

PeronealA tendon is a band of tissue that connects a muscle to a bone. The two peroneal tendons in the foot run side-by-side behind the outer ankle bone. One peroneal tendon attaches to the outer part of the midfoot, while the other tendon runs under the foot and attaches near the inside of the arch. The main function of the peroneal tendons is to stabilize the foot and ankle and protect them from sprains.

Causes and Symptoms of Peroneal Tendon Injuries
Peroneal tendon injuries may be acute (occurring suddenly) or chronic (developing over a period of time). They most commonly occur in individuals who participate in sports that involve repetitive ankle motion. In addition, people with higher arches are at risk for developing peroneal tendon injuries. Basic types of peroneal tendon injuries are tendonitis, tears, and subluxation.

Tendonitis is an inflammation of one or both tendons. The inflammation is caused by activities involving repetitive use of the tendon, overuse of the tendon, or trauma (such as an ankle sprain). Symptoms of tendonitis include:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Warmth to the touch

Acute tears are caused by repetitive activity or trauma. Immediate symptoms of acute tears include:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Weakness or instability of the foot and ankle

As time goes on, these tears may lead to a change in the shape of the foot, in which the arch may become higher.

Degenerative tears (tendonosis) are usually due to overuse and occur over long periods of time – often years. In degenerative tears, the tendon is like taffy that has been overstretched until it becomes thin and eventually frays. Having high arches also puts you at risk for developing a degenerative tear. The symptoms of degenerative tears may include:

  • Sporadic pain (occurring from time to time) on the outside of the ankle
  • Weakness or instability in the ankle
  • An increase in the height of the arch

Subluxation – one or both tendons have slipped out of their normal position. In some cases, subluxation is due to a condition in which a person is born with a variation in the shape of the bone or muscle. In other cases, subluxation occurs following trauma, such as an ankle sprain. Damage or injury to the tissues that stabilize the tendons (retinaculum) can lead to chronic tendon subluxation. The symptoms of subluxation may include:

  • A snapping feeling of the tendon around the ankle bone
  • Sporadic pain behind the outside ankle bone
  • Ankle instability or weakness

Early treatment of a subluxation is critical, since a tendon that continues to sublux (move out of position) is more likely to tear or rupture. Therefore, if you feel the characteristic snapping, see a foot and ankle surgeon immediately.

Diagnosis
Because peroneal tendon injuries are sometimes misdiagnosed and may worsen without proper treatment, prompt evaluation by a foot and ankle surgeon is advised. To diagnose a peroneal tendon injury, the surgeon will examine the foot and look for pain, instability, swelling, warmth, and weakness on the outer side of the ankle. In addition, an x-ray or other advanced imaging studies may be needed to fully evaluate the injury. The foot and ankle surgeon will also look for signs of an ankle sprain and other related injuries that sometimes accompany a peroneal tendon injury. Proper diagnosis is important because prolonged discomfort after a simple sprain may be a sign of additional problems.

Non-Surgical Treatment
Treatment depends on the type of peroneal tendon injury. Options include:

  • Immobilization. A cast or splint may be used to keep the foot and ankle from moving and allow the injury to heal.
  • Medications. Oral or injected anti-inflammatory drugs may help relieve the pain and inflammation.
  • Physical therapy. Ice, heat, or ultrasound therapy may be used to reduce swelling and pain. As symptoms improve, exercises can be added to strengthen the muscles and improve range of motion and balance.
  • Bracing. The surgeon may provide a brace to use for a short while or during activities requiring repetitive ankle motion. Bracing may also be an option when a patient is not a candidate for surgery.

When is Surgery Needed?
In some cases, surgery may be needed to repair the tendon or tendons and perhaps the supporting structures of the foot. The foot and ankle surgeon will determine the most appropriate procedure for the patient’s condition and lifestyle. After surgery, physical therapy is an important part of rehabilitation.

For all Appointments and Inquiries, please call: (773) 752 2111

Email: info@footexperts.com
Website: www.footexperts.com

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Surgeons Warn: Skateboarding Tough on Feet, Ankles

BOARD TRICKS, REPEATED FOOT IMPACT CAN LEAD TO SERIOUS INJURY

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Children and young adults love the thrill of skateboarding. They learn to master their skills of “riding the rail” and “catching air.” But according to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), such tricks, while fun, can be physically demanding and cause serious foot and ankle injuries.

Foot and ankle surgeons around the country warn they continue to see serious lower-extremity skateboard injuries among their patients. These injuries range from minor bruises to open wounds or cuts to more serious foot and ankle sprains and fractures, which may require surgical repair.

Virginia-based foot and ankle surgeon, Jennifer Purvis, DPM, AACFAS, advises skateboarders to use caution and wear protective gear, including properly supportive shoes, when skateboarding. “Skateboarding can be particularly hard on your feet and ankles because of the impact caused when performing jumps and tricks,” Dr. Purvis explains.  “Skateboarders should be aware that the strain from repetitive, forceful motions can also cause painful foot and heel conditions such as plantar fasciitis, bone spurs and Achilles tendonitis, which may require more intensive, longer-term therapies,” she said.

Even minor cuts or abrasions on your feet can cause serious problems.  Dr. Purvis recently treated a 21-year-old skateboarder for scrapes on his feet and ankles that were not healing. Tests indicated he had contracted MRSA – a very serious and sometimes deadly staph infection, which required surgery and four weeks of antibiotic therapy.

Foot and ankle sprains and fractures are common skateboarding injuries. Karl Collins, DPM, FACFAS, who practices in St. Louis, stresses the importance of seeing a foot and ankle surgeon to ensure proper diagnosis and course of treatment for these injuries. Until you can be seen by a doctor, it is best to take a break from activities and use R.I.C.E. therapy (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation), which helps to reduce pain and control swelling around the injury.

“A common misconception about foot and ankle fractures is that if you can walk on the foot, there isn’t a fracture,” Dr. Collins said. “That’s not always the case, and only a proper diagnosis can rule out a serious injury requiring an advanced treatment plan.”

For all Appointments and Inquiries, please call: (773) 752 2111

Email: info@footexperts.com
Website: www.footexperts.com

Foot & Ankle Clinics of America FACA on Facebook, click here for more info.

Follow Foot & Ankle Clinics of America on Twitter