Sore Feet Chicago – See a Podiatrists

PAINFUL FEET?

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The foot does not simply bear the weight of the whole body, but the weight springs off it many times a minute in walking, running or jumping and it helps to absorb the impact of landing. The bones, ligaments and muscles absorb an enormous amount of impact over a lifetime, especially in an athlete, but perhaps more so in the people that are overweight.

The foot is a dynamic piece of engineering. It has both a longitudinal and a transverse arch. The longitudinal arch is higher on the medial side. The foot may be inspected with the patient seated and the foot elevated to facilitate inspection, especially of the sole, but it is essential to examine the foot in a weight-bearing mode. This is when almost all the problems occur in this dynamic structure and failure to do so will result in missing the correct diagnosis in most cases. Problems of the ankles, knees, hips and back also merit examination of the feet.

  • Painful feet are a very common problem. One cross-sectional postal survey reported a 9.4% prevalence of disabling foot conditions.[1]
  • Risk factors for foot pain include advancing age, obesity, injudicious footwear, high-impact exercise (eg, jogging) and underlying medical conditions (see under ‘Aetiology’ section).

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There are many causes of painful feet:

  • Neuropathy – eg, sciatica, peripheral neuropathy.
  • Ischemia from peripheral arterial disease or embolism.
  • Skin lesions may be painful including blisters, corns, calluses, fungal skin and nail infections, and bacterial infections (skin and osteomyelitis).
  • Hallux valgus (bunions).
  • Plantar fasciitis.
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • Freiberg’s disease.
  • Arthritis affecting the feet, especially rheumatoid arthritis or the painful first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint in acute gout.
  • Ingrowing toenails, especially if infected.
  • Abnormalities of the joints, ligaments and tendons of the foot.
  • Often there appears to be an inherent predisposition but other factors include poor footwear, obesity and hypermobility syndromes.

Foot rub

  • When did it start?
  • Is it getting worse?
  • Is the pain diffuse or at a point?
  • Establish aggravating and relieving factors.
  • Note occupation, sport, training routines, and any recent injury.
  • Is there pain elsewhere? Poor posture of the feet can cause pain in the ankles, knees and back.
  • Look at the shoes. What type of shoes does the patient choose to wear? Are they fashionable shoes that distort the foot? Trainers are unique in the history of footwear in being designed for feet but when did he or she last get a new pair? If training seriously, does he or she have several pairs? Just as cars need to have tyres and shock absorbers replaced periodically, so too trainers need replacing.
  • Is there abnormal or uneven wear of the shoes?
  • Note any obesity.
  • Does the shape of the foot look normal? Look at the sole. Is there abnormal callus? Weight should be taken over the first and fifth metatarsal heads. Callus over other metatarsal heads means fallen transverse arch.
  • Is there local tenderness?
  • Now examine the feet with the patient standing with both feet bare. Are the longitudinal arches normal? Can you get your finger under the medial arch? Look at the feet from behind. Fallen arches cause hyperpronation and upset the line of the Achilles tendon.
  • If there is a postural problem such as a fallen arch it is often possible to put something underneath it, like a small pile of leaflets, to correct the abnormality and to prove that posture can be corrected.

Children rarely complain of painful feet and if they do, think of a foreign body. Pressure from shoes on a prominent navicular bone, or sometimes an accessory bone, or a prominent posterosuperior os calcis may require surgical trimming.[2]Osteochondritis and similar conditions may affect the bones of the foot. Osteochondritis of the metatarsals is called Freiberg’s disease.[3] An X-ray will aid diagnosis. A podiatrist can help. Usually an insertion into the shoe is satisfactory but occasionally a plaster cast is required.

The first metatarsal shows angulation towards the midline. It usually affects teenagers and may run in families. If deformity is marked, a metatarsal or proximal wedge osteotomy may be beneficial.[4] The addition of a plantar shelf has been found to assist in bone healing.[5]

The first MTP joint has arthritis, pain and restricted movement. A dorsal ring of osteophytes may occur. In early cases manipulation and injection of the joint with steroid and local anaesthetic may offer relief but in more advanced cases, arthrodesis, Keller’s operation, distal oblique osteotomy or decompression osteotomy may be required.[6]

See the separate article on Nail Disorders and Abnormalities.

Surgical interventions are more effective than non-surgical interventions in preventing the recurrence of an ingrowing toenail. The addition of phenol is probably more effective in preventing recurrence and regrowth of the ingrowing toenail.[7]

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  • This is pain across the metatarsal heads. It is often due to collapse of the transverse arch. A range of abnormalities including plantar plate tears may be visible on ultrasound.[8]
  • A metatarsal pad will often reform the arch and give relief. If there are difficulties, ask a podiatrist to help.
  • Surgical treatment for severe painful rheumatoid forefoot deformities has usually involved resection of the metatarsal heads with realignment of the lesser toe deformities and first MTP joint arthrodesis.
  • Correction of severe rheumatoid forefoot deformities by arthrodesis of all five MTP joints has been suggested as an alternative surgical approach.[9]

There is pain from pressure on an interdigital neuroma between the metatarsals. Fashionable shoes often contribute. Pain usually radiates to the lateral side of one toe, and the medial side of its neighbour. Pressure on the affected web space reproduces the pain. Ultrasound and MRI are the best modalities to diagnose the condition. Excision of the neuroma may be needed.[10] Ultrasound-guided steroid injection may be another option.[11]

VISIT CHICAGO”S TOP PODIATRIST @ http://www.FootExperts.com

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Dr. Massuda performs Biomechanical and Musculoskeletal Assessment

Many problems in the lower limb, knee, hip and lower back are from the way our feet contact the ground.

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Foot and Ankle Clinics of America in Chicago can provide a comprehensive bio-mechanical and musculoskeletal assessment service to help us identify common and complex presentations resulting from your sporting injuries and general wear and tear on your feet.

Bio-mechanical and musculoskeletal problems can increase stresses within the foot structure and surrounding soft tissues creating pain. In some cases, the problem may lie in a number of areas such as poor posture, pelvic misalignment, leg length discrepancies and tight or poorly toned muscles.

Feet are our body’s foundation

Our bio-mechanical and musculoskeletal assessment focuses on the foot, ankle and knee joints and further includes the pelvis and lower back whilst assessing the relationship between them. The bio-mechanical assessment highlights compensatory movements at the pelvis and throughout the lower limbs and particularly at the major joints of the ankle and foot.

Correction of poor foot bio-mechanics with orthotics can improve and prevent many types of symptoms to include:

  • Pediatric / children’s foot problems and rolling in at the ankle
  • Forefoot pain, Morton’s Neuroma – (Metatarsaglia)
  • Bunions – (Hallux Limitus or Hallux Rigidus)
  • Arch strain – (Plantar Fasciitis)
  • Policeman’s Heel – (Heel Spur)
  • Ankle Pain – (Tibialis Dysfunction, Lateral impingement Syndrome)
  • Shin Pain – (Compartmental Syndrome, Shin Splints)
  • Knee Pain
  • Patellofemoral syndrome
  • Lower back pain

Information compiled throughout the bio-mechanical assessment allows Foot and Ankle Clinics of America in Chicago to prescribe effective treatment and orthotic devices. 

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I need a ankle Doctor in Orland Park

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It happens all the time to people from all walks of life. You trip on a curb, step out of a car, or slip on the ice and suddenly you are in desperate need of an ankle doctor. Fortunately, there is a well-respected ankle doctor in Orland Park at the Foot & Ankle Clinics of America. With a board certification and privileges at some of Chicagoland’s most respected hospitals, you know you are getting the best care possible.

Now that you know that the Foot & Ankle Clinics of America is the place to go for treatment from a qualifiedankle doctor in Orland Park, you might be curious why ankle injuries are so varied in treatment. For instance, two people step off of a curb wrong in a similar way, but one person requires surgery while the other has only a minor sprain. Well, only an ankle doctor in Orland Park or elsewhere in the country could tell you the exact answer, but there are some simple explanations.

The Foot & Ankle Clinics of America‘s podiatrist will tell you that one of the main determinations for the seriousness of an injury is the flexibility of the joint prior to tripping on a curb or slipping on the ice. Individuals that are flexible tend to have less severe injuries. However, if an individual has experienced several sprains or strains in the past, then an ankle doctor in Orland Park may discover that the tendons, bones, muscles, and/or ligaments are damaged and loose. This makes the person more susceptible to injury.

When a person has a history of injuries to the ankle a podiatrist may determine that reconstruction of the joint is required to prevent further problems and damage. In this scenario, you want an ankle doctor in Orland Park that has experience with reconstruction. The Foot & Ankle Clinics of America has over 32 years dealing with all forms of reconstruction using the most modern techniques. Patients who undergo the procedure are often shocked the first time they experience a wrong step or twist of the ankle that would have caused a major problem in the past is of no consequence after surgery.

Of course, in some instances tripping on a curb or slipping on the ice can cause a severe problem without a prior history. It is easy for major injuries like a break to happen with any fall. An ankle doctor in Orland Parkor Chicagoland can treat the most severe traumas with a cast or surgery. The healing time can vary from a few weeks to a few months, but only a trained ankle doctor in Orland Park or Chicago, like the professionals at the Foot & Ankle Clinics of America can determine the right course of treatment.

Typically, when a person takes a tumble the result is a sore ego with a few bumps and bruises, but there are occasions that cause more than a minor sprain or strain. If an injury is severe or isn’t healing, it is critical that a qualified ankle doctor in Orland Park or Chicago is seen as soon as possible to prevent permanent damage. An appointment can be made at the Foot & Ankle Clinics of America website. We will help get you back on both feet in no time!

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Be good to your feet: Foot Tips by Chicago’s Top Podiatrist

Happy feet is a Happy Life

Never ignore your foot pain. It can result in many other health issues such as disease, and back issues.

Here’s our foot tip of the week:

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The Hated Cracked heels

Not moisturizing your feet can lead to heels that become dry and cracked.

Always wash your feet daily by using water, and a mild soap, but most of all dry your feet completely.

Now exfoliate your dead skin with the following:

  • Pumice Stone: Granulated stone is the ideal beauty tool for dry feet. They are available in a variety of shapes, and sizes for easy use.
  • Scrubs: Are specially formulated to work on your feet, foot scrubs typically contain ingredients that stimulate circulation, and condition the skin while cleaning away dead skin cells.
  • Creams: These are similar to common moisturizers, which provide a little something extra for your tired feet. They penetrate the skin with intense moisture, and provide long relief over time.

To make the most of your daily foot care, apply a foot cream nightly. Invigorate your feet with Tea Tree Oil, and moisturizer them with Shea Butter to ensure your feet stay soft like a newborns bottom.

 

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Simple Suggestions for Healthy Feet

A few foot friendly tips from Dr. Massuda and her staff

  • Keep your feet clean and dry.
  • Apply olive oil or lanolin to dry skin.
  • Avoid using hot water and use mild soaps.
  • Dry skin carefully and completely. Do not rub hard with a towel.
  • Avoid if possible athlete’s foot infection, use a mild fungicidal powder.
  • Do not cut callouses, corns, or ingrown toe nails.
  • Avoid bruises, burns, cracks, cuts, and frostbite. If any of these injuries occur, seek professional advice immediately.
  •  Avoid using harsh or strong medications such as antiseptics containing iodine or carbolic acid, etc., corn cures, or chemical compounds and ointments for athlete’s foot.
  • Avoid exposure to cold and dampness.
  • Seek immediate professional care for any ulcer or sore on the foot or leg.
  • Proper care and treatment of your feet will relieve pain and help your feet to carry on the duties necessary to living a full and happy life.

If you are having trouble with your feet or ankles, don’t ignore them! Contact us for an evaluation at (773) 752-2111. Your back (and knees and hips) will thank you later.

 

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Diabetic Foot Care, Why do you need Diabetic Shoes?

 

A common side effect of diabetes is “peripheral neuropathy,” which causes loss of sensation in the extremities. Ill-fitting shoes that rub or pinch the feet excessively can lead to ulceration and foot injury, simply because the diabetic does not feel the injury until it is too late.

The Foot and Ankle Clinics of America supports the research which states properly fitted diabetic shoes are very important in preventing such injuries. By partnering with Dr. Comfort, Foot and Ankle Clinics of America can provide footwear and specialty insoles for diabetics to help alleviate and/or prevent foot pain and injury.

Diabetic shoes are often wider and deeper than regular shoes, to make room for special diabetic insoles. To ensure proper fit, minimize rubbing and uneven weight distribution, pedorthic insoles for diabetics are generally custom made for the patient’s feet, thus preventing injury. It is also important for a diabetic to have shoes with good air circulation; therefore many diabetic footwear features fabric or sandal-style uppers.

If you have any questions about diabetic shoes and their benefits, please contact one of our offices today to speak with one of our podiatrists about your specific needs.

That Pain in Your Back Could be Linked to Your Feet

Back pain and feet by Foot Health Facts

If your lower back has been hurting, and you don’t remember doing anything to injure it, the source of your pain could be your feet! Foot pain is something that many people try to ignore. After all, doesn’t everyone’s feet hurt now and then? But if foot pain is something that has been with you for quite awhile, it could be causing problems in your ankles, knees, hips and even your back.

That old song, “The leg bone’s connected to the thigh bone…The thigh bone’s connected to the hip bone…,” tells the whole story. Our bodies are like a chain, with one link–or bone–connecting at the joint to another link. Think about what would happen if the first link in the chain was out of position. The point at which it meets the next link would eventually overstress that link and adversely affect the entire chain.

That’s what happens when we have foot pain. If the normal way of walking is painful, we instinctively change our walking pattern. Say you have arthritis, and your big toe joint hurts, so you change our gait to avoid bending the joint when you walk. Changing your gait changes the mechanics of your ankle joint, eventually causing ankle pain. This change in your walking pattern can also affect the whole chain of your lower body… from the ankle, to the knee, to the hip, and then to the lower back.

When foot pain or a foot deformity causes you to change the way you walk, it changes the way the bones of all those other joints move with each other. Cartilage in the joints can wear down, ligaments and tendons can be stressed beyond their normal range, and arthritis can set in.

If your feet or ankles aren’t working right, don’t ignore them! Contact a foot and ankle surgeon for an evaluation. Your back (and knees and hips) will thank you!